I touched it – Doug’s 5 minute iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus review

I touched it,
I put my hand around it and I touched it
I felt a sudden tingle when I I touched it
A sparkle, a glow
I knew it…
It wasn’t accidental, no,
I knew it
I touched it…
I touched it…
And suddenly… nothing, nothing, nothing is the same!

Doug is in full “new gadget mode.”

I cycled (not jogged) over to my nearby AU shop and tried out the new iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus. At the risk of sounding like a drunk-the-kool-aid fanboy, I really love the iPhone 6 Plus.

First a few notes about the iPhone 6 versus the iPhone 6 Plus. If it were just the iPhone 6, and you have a perfectly good iPhone 5 (like I do) I might just wait another year. The iPhone 6 is incrementally better. It’s a bit bigger, so you get an extra row of icons. It’s a bit heavier than the iPhone 5, but not so much that I noticed. And it’s thinner. And it has the touch ID button, which the iPhone 5 doesn’t have. And it has a better camera too (e.g. the slo-mo video processor). So it is nicer for sure. But like I said, incrementally so.

If you are still using an iPhone 4S I would say the iPhone 6 is a huge improvement and by all means upgrade. If you have an iPhone 5S I would say there is maybe nothing overwhelmingly compelling about it because that phone already has the touch ID and other improvements. If you have an iPhone 5 I would say “it depends” – on how gadget crazy you are, and the condition of your iPhone 5.

However, if you have an iPhone 5 and you’ve been feeling cramped in your screen space then the iPhone 6 Plus is like wow.

Here they are both in one hand. (You can click all the photos to see them full size.)

Photo Sep 19, 2 51 55 PM

Both fit very comfortably in the shirt pocket of the shirt I’m wearing today. And the iPhone 6 Plus did not feel heavy at all, which was my main concern, since it weighs 50% more than the iPhone 5. I think the fact it is thinner than the iPhone 5 helps. The main points for me are:

The screen is amazingly clear and beautiful.

The camera is much better, and has optical stabilization.

You can just see so much more. You don’t feel “cramped” at all.

And it is obviously faster than my iPhone 5, which is obviously faster than the iPhone 4S I was using this summer.

Here are some screen views, shot with my iPhone 5. Are they beautiful, or what?

Photo Sep 19, 2 50 29 PM Photo Sep 19, 2 50 56 PM

In case you’re wondering if more really is displayed, or if it is the same content as on the iPhone 5 but larger, it’s easy to compare. That last screenshot is of a blog post. On the iPhone 6 the first line reads, “Mon is at it again. Instead of fighting with Monta over the” – and then the line breaks.

On the iPhone 5 the same post reads, “Mon is at it again. Instead of fighting with” and then the line breaks.

So more content is shown per line on the iPhone 6 Plus.

Top to bottom also, both pictures are visible completely on the iPhone 6 Plus, as well as the tags below it. On the iPhone 5 the view gets cut off about half-way through the 2nd photo.

So there is more vertical content on the iPhone 6 Plus too. Just more of everything.

I can see possibly using this instead of an iPad. In fact, I wonder how much the iPhone 6 Plus might cannibalize iPad Mini sales.

Yet it is comfortable. And fits in my shirt pocket. And doesn’t seem too heavy.

One question I have is would I look like a dork talking on the phone with something that large? (See unflattering photo below.)

Photo Sep 19, 2 49 49 PM

 

iOS catches up with Android on some essential features

When I commented in the past that Android had a handful of features that were superior to iOS, these were them.

https://gigaom.com/2014/09/15/6-great-ios-8-features-iphone-6-plus/

While Apple is clearly borrowing from Android, I’m glad these new features will be part of iOS. It makes it even more attractive to stick with the iPhone.

Still, in this case, it should be remembered who is borrowing from whom.

The iPhone 6 Plus – that is one heavy iPhone!

You know, I was pretty excited about the 5.5″ iPhone 6 Plus, but I’m going to have to think about that one carefully and try it out first before deciding whether to upgrade or not. That is one HEAVY iPhone!

My current iPhone 5 (and the iPhone 5S) are both just 112 g and 7.6 mm thick. That is noticeably thinner and lighter than the iPhone 4S I used this summer (140 g and 9.3 mm thick).

When I was able to return to the iPhone 5 I felt relieved about the larger size of the screen, the faster speed, how thin it was and also the obviously lighter weight. The difference between 140 g and 112 g is a noticeable difference

Now Apple is moving in the same direction it did with iPads for a few years, until it finally came back with the lighter iPad Air.

The 4.7-inch iPhone 6 is thinner than the 4-inch iPhone 5 (6.9 mm vs 7.6 mm) but heaver: 129 g vs 112 g. Well, for 17 g maybe the larger size and other benefits are worth it.

But the 5.5-inch iPhone 6 Plus gives me pause. While 1/2 mm thinner than the iPhone 5 (7.1 mm vs 7.6 mm) look at how heavy it is! 172 g vs 112 g!

That’s 54% heavier than the iPhone 5!

Wow!

That gives me pause…

I’m going to have to think about that one…

Cloud storage and online doc creation and collaboration musings

How many of my friends here use Office 365? The competition for cloud space, and online document collaboration is growing very competitive. For example, DropBox for Business just upped their disk allocation from 100 GB to 1 Terabyte, with extra permission controls for just $100/year.

Office 365 subscriptions, which are just $99 a year for up to five PCs or Macs plus tablets also includes 1 TB of disk space per user. Office.com itself, for online document creation and sharing, is free for Macs and PCs (paid for iPad doc creation) and includes 15 GB of storage. But so is a free Google Docs account.

I tend to use Google Docs for online creating and collaborating on Word docs and spreadsheets.  I think that is 15 GB per user for the free accounts.

Yet on my Mac itself I’m still using Office 2008. So I’m wondering why I don’t get an Office 365 subscription, which will upgrade my Office immediately to Office 2011, and very shortly to Office 2014. I know Microsoft is playing catchup with Google Docs, but wouldn’t compatibility be better with my desktop Office apps and Office 365 in the cloud? Or does it really matter?

I’m thinking if I’m going to upgrade Office anyway soon to Office 2014 for the Mac, then why not subscribe to Office 365? That way I’ll have the most recent Office desktop versions at a reasonable price for both Mac and Windows. But if I do, should I start using Office.com more instead of Google Drive?

It’s all getting a bit confusing. I suspect most of the people I work with have been doing the same thing I have: using Office desktop versions on their Mac or Windows, and using Google Docs online. But isn’t that just because Microsoft didn’t have a viable online version to compete with Google Docs before? It’s hard to drag people away from the work patterns they are used to.

Any thoughts?