One way to deal with radioactive waste – just pretend it’s not there

From the Japan News – full article with picture at http://the-japan-news.com/news/article/0002031113

Radioactive waste left in limbo / Local authorities avoid filing paperwork for 3,600 tons

More than 3,600 tons of radioactive waste has not been designated as emitting radiation at levels above the national standard because municipal authorities have avoided submitting applications to the central government, according to research by the Environment Ministry.

At least 3,648 tons of radioactive waste has not been properly designated in five prefectures, including Miyagi Prefecture. The waste was generated by the crisis at the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant.

Municipal governments must apply for designation by the central government, but they are concerned about shouldering the responsibility of storing the waste and becoming subject to harmful rumors. However, experts say that submitting applications for designation is a necessity, due to concern over the spread of radioactive contamination.

The volume of waste that had not been so designated — despite radiation levels exceeding national standards — was 2,711 tons in Miyagi, 710 tons in Iwate, 113 tons in Saitama, and lower volumes in two other prefectures.

“The burden is too big for cities to manage by ourselves,” said an official of the city government of Kurihara, Miyagi Prefecture, which has 974 tons of rice straw with radioactivity levels exceeding the national standard.

An official of Ichinoseki, Iwate Prefecture said, “Once we receive designation, harmful rumors like ‘That city or area is dangerous’ will spread, and people might hesitate to buy their farm products.” Ichinoseki has not submitted applications regarding 640 tons of waste.

An official in charge of Takahagi, Ibaraki Prefecure, said, “We talk to farmers about whether to apply, but they might not want to reveal the existence of rice straw that has radiation levels exceeding the national standard.” Takahagi has not submitted applications for 0.4 tons of waste.

An official of the Kurihara city government said, “The disadvantages of receiving the designation outweigh [the advantages] under the present circumstances.”

However, the town of Wakuya, Miyagi Prefecture, intends to submit applications next fiscal year for 270 tons of waste currently stored at farms in the town.

“Farmers may express fears over harmful rumors, but it’s safer to receive the designation and have the town manage [the waste] responsibly,” an official of the town government said.

Fukushima radioactive contamination sets off alarm

From NHK

The operator of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant says it has detected high levels of radioactive substances in a drainage channel on the plant’s premises on Sunday. The Tokyo Electric Power Company is investigating the cause.

TEPCO says the plant’s alarm system went off around 10 AM. It showed a rise in radioactivity in the channel that leads to a nearby port.

Measurements showed that levels of beta-ray emitting substances, which are not detected under normal circumstances, had risen to up to 7,230 Becquerels per liter.

The figure is 10 times higher than when rain causes the level to rise temporarily.

The utility suspects that contaminated water in the channel may have leaked into the port.

It has suspended all operations to transfer contaminated water and closed a gate of the channel by the port.

The drainage channel used to be connected to a section of coast beyond the port. TEPCO rerouted it after a series of leaks in 2013.

The company says the water level in a tank that contains contaminated water remains unchanged, showing no signs of leakage, and drain valves that keep water from leaking near the tanks remain closed.

The utility is investigating the cause of the rise of radioactivity in the channel.

More Fukushima related news – for California

LOS ANGELES (Jiji Press) — A U.S. institute has said that trace amounts of radioactive cesium-134 emitted from Tokyo Electric Power Co.’s Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant were detected in Pacific waters off the northern California coast.

The radioactive substance was found in water collected at a point about 150 kilometers off Eureka, Calif., in August this year, according to the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

It is the first time that a radioactive material from the crippled plant has been detected in waters off the United States.

ref: http://the-japan-news.com/news/article/0001722569

Meanwhile in Fukushima

Tokyo Electric Power Co. will postpone scrapping the crippled No. 1 unit of its Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant as the company has already run into delays, officials said.

TEPCO presented draft revisions to its plan at a meeting with the government on Thursday. The two sides are working to revise the existing reactor dismantling timetable by next spring.

The draft calls for deferring the start of operations to remove spent nuclear fuel stored in a fuel pool in the No. 1 unit until fiscal 2019. It is currently scheduled for fiscal 2017.

It also calls for the removal of melted nuclear fuel to begin in fiscal 2025, against the current target of fiscal 2020.

“We haven’t decided on the new timetable yet,” said an official at the Agency for Natural Resources and Energy. “We are seeking to move forward with the schedule as much as possible.”

But radiation levels remain elevated in the disaster-hit nuclear plant, making it hard to speed up the work.